Monday, 4 November 2019

Cosplay hair - Hairstyle for my warrior Lúthien variation

 
I really like the hairstyle I came up with for my ☄️ ⚔️Warrior!Lúthien cosplay variation ☄️⚔️ :D. It's a braided paranda ponytail with side braids and a front pompadour, decorated with leaf ribbon and 
flowers.

My warrior!Lúthien is heavily inspired by the headcanon that Elven fashion is markedly oriental-inspired, especially in The Silmarillion (well, in LOTR movies it's like that in a lot of ways too). I found this gorgeous blue-and-black pants+tunic silk ensemble with flower embroidery (I think it might be a Vietnamese áo dài?) at a 2107 convention and instantly thought of Lúthien in a more warrior mode (as opposed to using magic and badassery alone, which is equally amazing, of course). Head over to my cosplay Instagram if you want to see more of my cosplays :) : @arwendeluhtienecosplay !
 
  • For this style I used:
-Backcombing comb 
-Fake hair rats for the pompadour
-Hairspray and/or fixing gel as needed
-Wide-tooth comb and/or brush as needed.
-A metal-free elastic for the initial ponytail
-Open pins, bobby pins
-Paranda for the braid
-Leaf ribbon
-Plastic decorative flowers
-A leaf barrette
  • Steps:
1) The front pompadour
 
- Separate a front section of your hair, flip it upside-down and backcomb it gently with the comb. You can hairspray the section before teasing for a better hold. This backcombing helps create more structure in the hair so that the shape will hold better and longer. 
You can also create front volume without backcombing, but I find it easier with a bit of teasing because my hair is so straight, fine-textured and slippery.

-I use fake hair rats under that backcombed front section to create the volume I want. Comb the hair over the hair rats very gently (so as not to destroy the teasing we just did xD) and shape the pompadour the way you prefer. Then secure it in place with bobby pins at the back of the head. 
 
-I used a leaf barrette over the place where I secured the pompadour at the back to hide the bobby pins.
-Use hairspray as needed.

About backcombing: I backcomb sporadically for cosplay, and reenactment, and, by keeping it gentle and always in the root area (never the length or tips!), I don't think it particularly harms my hair. I always use a Tangle Teezer to remove the backcombing tangling at the end of the day, and the hair loss is minimal (if any, sometimes). The fake hair pieces/hair rats are the main helper when it comes to achieving the desired volume, so I only backcomb to the point when I can get a bit of structure to hold the hair rats in place without the pompadour loosing its shape. 
Hairspray also helps too keep it all in place, but of course, it's not very good for the hair to use a lot to often. Having greasy-prone roots, hairspray actually doesn't dry my hair overmuch xD, but I get a lot of build up and it's generally not very hair-friendly, so my daily fixator is aloe vera gel, and I only use hairspray, and certainly this amount of it, when I need to have a large pompadour going on and/or a more complex hairstyle staying in place for the whole day xDD

2) Side braids: Separate two side pieces of hair and braid them, adding ribbons (in my case, I used leaf ribbons).

3) Braided paranda ponytail:
-Pull the rest of the hair into a high ponytail - mid-height is my preference. 
 -Add the side braids before securing it with a metal-free elastic.
-Braid the ponytail, with a paranda for added volume (tutorial here).
 
 3) Final touches:
-I use a couple of open bun pics to polish some flyaways at the nape.
-Add the decorative flowers along the side braids, near the base of the ponytail (the flowers can also partly hide the elastic), and/or along the braid as well, as desired.
-Add aloe vera gel or a bit more hairspray to set the style and potential flyaways (if you want), and it's done!
 
Pic gallery:
  • May 2018 
 
  • At the 2019 EstelCon (annual convention of the Spanish Tolkien Society). Featuring Tai Chi, archery, singing and helping out at a conference xD




 
SwordWomanRiona / rionashairblog.blogspot.com.es
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Friday, 27 September 2019

Historical hairstyles - Valkyrie knotted ponytail (Janet Stephens style)

One of my hair staples for more than a year has been Janet Stephens' knotted Valkyrie ponytail, a historical style inspired by Scandinavian depictions of Valkyries:



This length-shortening updo/half-up is pretty easy and fast to do and very comfortable to wear. I've been wearing the standard Valkyrie ponytail and my braided variation (either three-strand or rope-braid) as a weekly staple for more than a year now 😃. A recorded tutorial of my own version of Janet Stephens' video will be coming soon, but in the meantime here are some written instructions as usual, as well as the (ample) pic gallery 😃 xD
  • For this style I used:
-Comb and/or brush as needed.
-A metal-free elastic for the initial ponytail
-Hairstick
-Open pins for final touches

Steps:

-Pull the hair into a high ponytail - mid-height is my preference.
-Now comes the knot - Same as described in Janet Stephens' video above. The knot is enough to hold the hair in many cases, but I prefer to further secure the style using a hairstick. This also looks nice, and ensures that the hanging braid stays out of the way in a comfortable way.
-I use a couple of open bun pics to polish some flyaways at the nape.
-Add aloe vera gel or hairspray to set the style and potential flyaways (if you want), and it's done!
  • Picture gallery of this style (to be updated from time to time) (for larger size, click on pics or open in new tab): 
 

-With side braids:

 

-As a cosplay style:
SwordWomanRiona / rionashairblog.blogspot.com.es
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Thursday, 12 September 2019

Cosplay hair - Knotted ponytail at a Tolkien convention

During the May 2019 EstelCon, the annual convention of the Spanish Tolkien Society, I wore one of my hair staples for more than a year, Janet Stephens' knotted Valkyrie ponytail, with a casual ranger look (aka Merida's kirtle and cloak xD):

  Janet Stephens' video of this style:

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Wednesday, 4 September 2019

2019 hair - Paranda French braid

I've been wearing more French braids recently, and I had missed how comfy they are :)! So here's a paranda French braid with a flexi 8 from an August outing:

 
 


SwordWomanRiona / rionashairblog.blogspot.com.es
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Monday, 2 September 2019

Hairstyles - Knotted braided ponytail (Valkyrie hairstyle variation)

 Today's hairstyle tutorial is this rope-braided variation of the Valkyrie Ponytail, which I learnt thanks to Janet Stephens' video:

This length-shortening updo/half-up is pretty easy and fast to do and very comfortable to wear. I've been wearing the standard Valkyrie ponytail and my braided variation (either three-strand or rope-braid) as a weekly staple for nearly a year now :D. Recorded tutorials will be coming soon, but in the meantime here are some written instructions as usual :)

These pics are from an August outing and feature my red and green paranda . This ensemble always kinda reminds me of a Roman priestess for some reason 😃 xD
 



  • For this style I used:
-Comb and/or brush as needed.
-A metal-free elastic for the initial ponytail
-Paranda for the braid
-Hairstick
-Open pins for final touches

Steps:
 
-Pull the hair into a high ponytail - mid-height is my preference.
-Braid the ponytail, with a paranda for added volume (tutorial here). In my case I rope-braided it
-Now comes the knot - Same as described in the video above, but with the braid. The knot is enough to hold the hair in many cases, but I prefer to further secure the style using a hairstick. This also looks nice, and ensures that the hanging braid stays out of the way in a comfortable way.
-I use a couple of open bun pics to polish some flyaways at the nape.
-Add aloe vera gel or hairspray to set the style and potential flyaways (if you want), and it's done!

Post will be updated with more pics of this style soon!
 
SwordWomanRiona / rionashairblog.blogspot.com.es
If you copy-and-paste this post and/or alter it without any permission, credit or link, you're stealing my content. In that case, please stop. Please ask before using my work, or at least share it properly, giving credit to me and my blog.

Monday, 26 August 2019

Cosplay hair - Paranda braid for an Elven cosplay with a 14th Century Medieval twist

Cosplay hair pic spam today :D! For the first day at a Tolkien convention last May I wore my Elven purple dress with a parada braid (just a simple three-strand braid with a paranda). I also debuted a late 14th Century-early 15th Century reenactment, so I gave this cosplay a 14th Century twist with the liripipe open hood that I quite like :D (the dress, while not historically accurate, gives me 14th Century vibes as well because it reminds me of the long-sleeved cottehardies). 

So, braid pics incoming!






SwordWomanRiona / rionashairblog.blogspot.com.es
If you copy-and-paste this post and/or alter it without any permission, credit or link, you're stealing my content. In that case, please stop. Please ask before using my work, or at least share it properly, giving credit to me and my blog.

Sunday, 25 August 2019

Historical haircare - Ancient Roman hairstyling at the Museum of London

During my last Summer London trip I visited The Museum of London, and there was a whole section devoted to Ancient Roman female hairstyling, make-up and dressing, so finally getting some content back on this blog with some historical hairstyling and haircare (I also talked from a feminist lens about modesty mindsets in Ancient Roman female fashion, in this case regarding veiling with the palla, in the latest post of my other blog, where I talk about feminism, history and fandoms).

 "Hair was seen as much as an indication of wealth and social status as it was of taste and fashion. But unlike modern-day hairstyles, comfort and naturalism for the Romans took a back-seat to hairstyles that displayed the wearer's wealth to a maximum. In other words, having a complex and unnatural hairstyle would be preferred to a simple one, because it would illustrate the wealth of the wearer in being able to afford to take the time to style their hair. For women to have a fashionable hairstyle showed they were part of the elegant Roman culture." (Source)



 "Hairnets and pins were in common usage (...). Poorer women would have used wooden pins, while the aristocracy used gold, ivory, crystal, silver or painted bone. The pins were decorated with carvings of the gods, or beads and pendants" (Source)



“For keeping the hair in place pins were used, of ivory, silver, and gold, often mounted with jewels. Some wealthy Roman women favored long hairpins encrusted with jewels. (...) Nets (reticulae) and ribbons (vittae, taeniae, fasciolae) were also worn, but combs were not made a part of the headdress. (...) Mention should also be made of the garlands (coronae) of flowers, or of flowers and foliage, and of the coronets of pearls and other precious stones that were used to supplement the natural or artificial beauty of the hair. The woman's hairdresser was a female slave. This ornatrix was an adept in all the tricks of the toilet (...), and, besides, used all sorts of unguents, oils, and tonics to make the hair soft and lustrous and to cause it to grow abundantly. Common toilet articles including hairpins, hand mirrors made of highly polished metal, combs, and boxes for unguent or powder." (Source)



"Roman women originally dressed their hair with great simplicity. One of the simplest styles of wearing the hair was allowing it to fall down in tresses behind, and only confining it by a band encircling the head. Another favourite but simple hairstyle was braiding the hair, and then fastening it behind with a large pin. Young girls wore their long hair in simple buns tied at the base of the neck or wore their hair in a top knot. Simple hairstyles for married women changed during the reign of the Emperor Augustus when a variety of different and elaborate hairstyles came into fashion. The clothing fashions of Roman women remained relatively simple and unchanging and as women had no special dress that distinguished their status the wealthy women wore luxurious materials, highly elaborate hairstyles, make-up and expensive jewelry. During the rule of the Flavian emperors (69-138 BC) hairstyles were raised to a great height by rows of false curls. This fashion was described by the writer Juvenal as the hairstyles made women appear tall from the front but quite the opposite from the back.  The hair of Roman women become elaborately curled. Hairstyles were elaborately arranged in layers. Hairstyles involved hair being twisted, waved and curled. Ringlets were created to create hairstyles which fell to the sides and the backs of the head. Wigs and hair pieces were used to create an illusion of abundant locks." (Source)


I like Roman hairstyles a lot, so thanks to Janet Stephens' tutorials, hopefully I'll find some spare time sometime to try out some of them and post more about historical hair in this blog :D!